Patch testing guidelines - LIFTED. edition

We have put together a helpful blog post to give you our patch testing guidelines for LIFTED.

 

Patch testing for lash lifting and tinting is a must. An allergy or sensitivity is unfortunately something which occurs overtime, therefore it is more likely for allergies and sensitivities to occur when clients have been exposed to the product. Meaning a client who has been having lash lifts or lash tints for a while are more susceptible to a reaction compared to a new client who has never had the treatment before.

So, with that said, it is vital to patch test prior to carrying out the Lifted treatment. Most insurance companies require you to carry out a patch test to help prevent an allergic reaction from occurring.

WHERE TO START

  • Carry out a consultation
  • Always record the date of the patch test
  • Record where you have placed the products 
  • Place a small amount of product that will be used to either the wrists, inside of elbow and allow to dry (Tint must be mixed first).
  • Always have the client sign to say that they have had the patch test.
  • When returning for treatment make sure the form is signed again and the results of the patch test are updated. Any reaction is likely to occur within 24-48 hours. Ensure the client is aware that the past test must be left on for 24 hours, if no reaction occurs it can be washed off. However, if a reaction does occur, they should let you know and seek medical advice. IF there are any signs of redness, itching or swelling the treatment must not be carried out.
  • We advise re patch testing with Lifted every 6 months.

    We retail client record and consultation cards so that you can keep your clients' details to hand, document patch testing and log treatments with our record cards.

We hope this has helped to clear up any worries you have had about patch testing … now let’s get back to lashing!

As always, if you have any further questions feel free to get in touch with us over on Instagram @LashBase_UK and we’ll be happy to help.

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